Good Giving

ACR News 06.27.14—Tax Reform, Giving USA, Upcoming Interview with Patrick Rooney

>> Federal: Washington Roundup
>> Federal: New Senate Finance Committee Chairman Wyden Holds His First Tax Reform Hearing
>> Federal: Wyden Sets Tax Reform Timeline
>> Federal: Ways and Means Continues Piecemeal Approach
>> Federal: Upcoming ACR Interview with Dr. Patrick Rooney
>> Consider This: Mixed Messages
>> Top Reads: Giving USA 2014: Highlights


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Philanthropic Achievement of the Week

2011 Malaria Vaccine

Maleria
Malaria remains one of the most intractable diseases in the developing world, killing one million people a year and damaging the economic productivity of many more. Large resources have already been poured into combatting the disease, yet a McKinsey study has noted that $11 billion more would be needed to end malaria deaths in the 30 worst-affected African countries. One promising alternative funded with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is a vaccine. In 2011, the first-ever malaria vaccine was announced. It is still in trial stages, but so far seems to prevent severe symptoms in half of the individuals who receive it, while offering extra protection to infants and toddlers. While efficacy rates need to be improved before the vaccine is put into wide use, the initial findings have begun discussions about the long-dreamed-of possibility of widespread immunization in endemic countries.

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Philanthropic Achievement of the Week

1982 - Land Trusts Take Off

Land Trusts Take Off
Land trusts, or conservancies, are private nonprofits that protect land directly by owning it. Though their roots go back to the 1890s, in just the last generation land trusts have become one of the fastest growing and most successful elements of environmental conservation in the U.S. The grandaddy of land trusts is the Nature Conservancy (see 1951 entry), but there are others operating on a national level, like the American Farmland Trust, the Wetlands America Trust affiliated with Ducks Unlimited (see 1930 entry), the Appalachian Trail Conservancy, and trusts with specialized missions like the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and the Civil War Trust.

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Philanthropic Achievement of the Week

Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation

Statue of Liberty
The Statue of Liberty may be the best known monument in the world, and the adjoining Ellis Island immigration halls are among America’s most historic sites. Both venues have been restored and revamped for mass visitation entirely by private philanthropy. In 1982, as the centennial of the statue approached, President Ronald Reagan appointed Lee Lacocca, then chairman of Chrysler Corporation, to lead a private-sector effort to fund restoration and preservation; the Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation was born.

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Philanthropic Achievement of the Week

Saving Fisheries Through Catch Sharing

Concerned about the decline of the world’s fish population and the abysmal failures of existing government interventions to solve the problem, Barrett Walker decided to use market-based techniques and funding from his family’s Walker Foundation to attack the problem. He started a chain reaction of philanthropy that in less than ten years transformed solutions to overfishing.

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Philanthropic Achievement of the Week

Marcus Autism Center

Bernie Marcus Autism CenterIn the early 1990s, an employee in an Atlanta Home Depot outlet had been missing work, then showing up sleepless and unkempt. Company co-founder Bernie Marcus took her aside and asked what was wrong. “Her child had this strange—well, I guess we called it a disability at first,” says Marcus. “Nobody knew what it was. The child was not communicating. He would scream in pain and nobody knew why. Doctors didn’t have the patience to work with him…. That’s when I first saw how autism destroys families.”

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Major Achievements of American Philanthropy

Nature, Animals, and Parks

Many of America’s most iconic natural attractions are the products of philanthropy. Hundreds of national parks, urban green spaces, zoos and aquariums, public waterways and shorelines, wildlife and pet protections, gardens and arboretums have been created or bolstered by private givers. The first major patrons of nature giving in this country were John Rockefeller Jr. and then his son, Laurance. Their focused, timely support established or enlarged national parks like Grand Teton, Great Smoky Mountains, Virgin Islands, Yosemite, Big Bend, Rocky Mountain, Acadia, Olympic, Grand Canyon, Glacier, Haleakala, Redwood, Lassen Volcanic, Mesa Verde, and Shenandoah, as well as Antietam, Big Hole, Fort Donelson, and other battlefield parks, various state parks, the Marsh-Billings farm, the Blue Ridge Parkway, numerous historic sites and monuments, and local parks. But smaller donors and many grassroots voluntary philanthropic efforts have been even more important, helping save creatures like the peregrine falcon, swift fox, wild turkey, wolf, bluebird, and numerous fish, creating outdoor oases for everyday citizens to enjoy, conserving rare trees and plants, uncovering fresh solutions to ecological dilemmas, even pushing the boundaries of natural science through private support for physics and biological research. Donated money flows to these causes today at rates higher than ever before. The Environmental Grantmakers Association is able to identify billions of dollars of annual funding by U.S. donors.

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Jon M. Huntsman Sr. Named Recipient of William E. Simon Prize

Will be Honored at 2014 Annual Meeting of The Philanthropy Roundtable in Salt Lake City

WASHINGTON, D.C.— Jon M. Huntsman Sr. has been named the 2014 recipient of the William E. Simon Prize for Philanthropic Leadership, an annual award administered by The Philanthropy Roundtable that highlights the power of philanthropy to promote positive change and to inspire others to support charities that achieve genuine results. The prize is intended to honor living philanthropists who have shown exemplary leadership through their own charitable giving, either directly or through foundations they have created.

Huntsman—a four-time cancer survivor—notably founded the Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI), which combines research with out-patient and in-patient care, much of it informed by his own experience with cancer treatment. Huntsman built the state-of-the-art facility at the University of Utah despite being offered a one-to-one matching grant by the University of Southern California and two-to-one matching grants from both Duke and the University of Pennsylvania. Huntsman was undeterred in his decision to build HCI in Salt Lake City and even donated $10 million to seed the project.

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The Boston Marathon: A History of Charitable Giving

Today marks the one year anniversary of the bombing at the Boston Marathon. Our hearts and prayers go out to all those affected by this tragedy and we celebrate the triumph of those who have overcome catastrophe. Amid the horror, the American spirit of giving was on full display as complete strangers offered up their homes, their blood, their money, and other resources to help those in need. This spirit of giving is befitting of an event whose early history is centered on an act of generosity. The following excerpt from Philanthropy magazine’s Roadtrip Across Philanthropic America offers an insight into that history:

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Good Giving

ACR Blog: Diversity of Thought: Jefferson’s Influence on Philanthropy

“I deem it the duty of every man to devote a certain portion of his income for charitable purposes; and that it is his further duty to see it so applied and to do the most good for which it is capable.” -Thomas Jefferson

April 13 marks the 271st birthday of one of our nation’s most prominent founding fathers: Thomas Jefferson. While Jefferson clearly advocated for charity during his life, perhaps his most well-known philanthropic-related effort came when he offered his vast personal collection of books to reestablish the Library of Congress.

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