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(Blog): What’s My Line?



In the opening session of the 2015 ACR Summit for Leaders, we had a bit of fun with messaging around the charitable deduction while conveying the critical importance of communicating to Congress that this part of our tax code must be protected. In this session four speakers delivered four different messages about the charitable deduction and audience members voted for the most persuasive message. The presenters and moderator were all members of the Charitable Giving Coalition, which has provided a unique and unified voice on Capitol Hill on issues affecting the charitable deduction since 2009.

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Philanthropic Achievement of the Week

2007: Strengthening Character Through Sports

David Weekley was involved in character-building activities as a youth through Boy Scouts and church groups. After his success as a major home builder he decided to devote 50 percent of his money and his time to philanthropy, and character development was a key concern. It “is every bit as critical as economic aid or health care or education reform,” he told Philanthropy. Weekley was a longtime funder of Scouting, which reaches 20 or 25 percent of young people; sports, however, reaches around 75 percent. “I’m not personally a sports enthusiast but the country has become more focused athletically and more and more kids are involved,” said Weekley, so he set out looking for a charitable partner who could help children and their coaches build wholesome and productive values through athletics.

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Philanthropic Achievement of the Week

2008: Cause-oriented Journalism

Take one scoop of donors looking for new ways to affect public opinion and government policy, mix with three scoops of mainstream journalism bleeding red ink in the face of new Internet-based competition, and you get a layer-cake of donor-funded reporting operations. The granddaddy of these creations is ProPublica, founded by hyperactive liberal donors Herb and Marion Sandler to be a twenty-first-century muckraker, with a special focus on topics like gun control, civil rights, health care, fracking, campaign finance limits, labor laws, the Gulf oil spill, Guantanamo, and other policy hot buttons.

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Philanthropic Achievement of the Week

2014: New Orleans School District Goes All-charter

Before Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans public schools were the worst district in the second-lowest-performing state in the entire U.S. Fully 78 percent of NOLA students attended a school designated as “failing” by state standards. Then the storm wrecked 100 of the city’s 127 schools. Rather than rebuild the dysfunctional and corrupt school district, local leaders decided to instead create the nation’s most complete necklace of charter schools, then let them independently pursue a new set of higher common standards. Decision-making power was decentralized away from the old school-board bureaucracy and transferred to individual principals, teachers, and schoolhouses. Top charter operators from across the country were invited in to set up shop, and more than 40 different entities now operate charters in the city on a competitive basis. At the same time, school performance began to be monitored intensely, with the understanding that new schools given five-year operating charters would be shut down at the end of that period if their students were not succeeding.

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Philanthropic Achievement of the Week

2007: Healing the Upper Midwest

The business triumphs of Denny Sanford allowed him to retire to Florida at age 45–but he was soon itchy and returned to the upper Midwest where he had spent his entire previous life. After further commercial successes, he started giving away money. He turned his attention to the Sioux Valley Hospitals and Health System, beginning with a $16 million gift for a children’s hospital designed like a fairy castle. With his $400 million donation in 2007 (the largest single gift ever made to a U.S. health-care organization), the nonprofit was renamed Sanford Health. Sanford Health now includes nearly three dozen hospitals and more than 140 clinics, centered on South and North Dakota but spread across eight states, making it one of the largest rural, not-for-profit health systems in the nation.

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Philanthropic Achievement of the Week

1853: Connecting Orphans to Families

Charles Loring Brace was emphatic that the thousands of miserable homeless children roaming the streets of nineteenth-century New York had the “same capacities” and the same importance “as the little ones in our own homes.” That was an essential part of his Christian creed. But Brace also believed that “habits of life and the inner forces which form character” ultimately drive success and happiness, so it is important for unformed children to be given both love and good examples. He didn’t like traditional orphanages, which he thought fostered passivity and dependence, so in 1853 Brace founded the Children’s Aid Society and began helping boys and girls leave the streets and enter lodging houses that required small payments from the children to remind them of their capacity to support themselves. The society offered workshops and industrial schools that taught trade skills.

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Philanthropic Achievement of the Week

2000: Paying for Lynx Habitat at Loomis Forest

The Canada lynx was added to the U.S. endangered species list in 2000. One of the five areas of “critical habitat” for the animal was Loomis State Forest in Washington, where up to half of the cats in that state were thought to live. Most of that forest was trust land managed by the state, with the proceeds from timber sales going to schools to pay for the education of local children. In 1998 the state of Washington offered to end timber sales on the land if conservationists could raise sufficient funds—within one year—to compensate the schools for loss of this lumbering revenue. A local campaign was launched to raise $13 million in donations from private individuals and foundations.

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ACR News 01.09.15 - New Year, New Congress, What You Need to Know

>> Federal: Washington Roundup
>> Federal: Ryan Takes Ways and Means Gavel
>> Federal: Tax Reform Remains a Hot Topic
>> Federal: A Look Back at 2014
>> Consider This: Hitting the Ground or Spinning Your Wheels
>> Top Reads: Are Donor-Advised Funds the Best Place for Your Charitable Dollars?


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No Good Donation Goes Un-Sniped At

By Joanne Florino

Image © Heatherwick Studio
Image © Heatherwick Studio

As I read David Callahan’s November 30, 2014 New York Times opinion essay about the private philanthropy behind the planned Pier 55—a new offshore public park in a previously industrialized section of the Hudson River—I was reminded of one the old phrase: No good deed goes unpunished. While conceding that park-giving generosity is “admirable,” Mr. Callahan worries that “it also poses a threat to the ability of everyday Americans to have an equal voice in civic life” and “is part of a larger story about rising inequality and shrinking democracy.”

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ACR News 11.26.14—The Latest: Tentative Tax Extenders Deal in the Works

>> Federal: Washington Roundup
>> Federal: Latest Development: IRA Charitable Rollover Deal is Still Tentative
>> Federal: Updated Election Results
>> Federal: House Ways and Means Committee
>> Federal: Senate Finance Committee
>> Consider This: Big Picture
>> Bonus Consider This: Pardon Me
>> Top Reads: ACR Signs Letter Calling for Charity-Related Provisions to be Made Permanent


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